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IDIDAS : References: Differences in Body Size and Egg Loads of Rhagoletis indifferens(Diptera: Tephritidae) From Introduced and Native Cherries

Title

Differences in Body Size and Egg Loads of Rhagoletis indifferens(Diptera: Tephritidae) From Introduced and Native Cherries

Year

2011

Source

Environ. Entomol. 40(6): 1353-1362; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/EN11128

Abstract

 The western cherry fruit ßy, Rhagoletis indifferens Curran, infests introduced, domesticated sweet [Prunus avium (L.) L.], and tart cherries (Prunus cerasus L.) as well as native bitter cherry, Prunus emarginata (Douglas) Eaton. Bitter cherries are smaller than sweet and tart cherries and this could affect various life history traits of ßies. The objectives of the current study were to determine 1) if body size and egg loads of ßies infesting sweet, tart, and bitter cherries differ from one another; and 2) if any observed body size differences are genetically based or caused by the host fruit environment. Pupae and adults of both sexes reared from larval-infested sweet and tart cherries collected in Washington and Montana were larger than those reared from bitter cherries. In addition, ßies of both sexes caught on traps in sweet and tart cherry trees were larger than those caught in bitter cherry trees and females trapped from sweet and tart cherry trees had 54.0Ð98.8% more eggs. The progeny of ßies from naturally-infested sweet and bitter cherries reared for one generation in the laboratory on sweet cherry did not differ in size. The same also was true for progeny of sweet and bitter cherry ßies reared in the Þeld on bitter cherry. The results suggest that the larger body sizes of ßies from sweet and tart cherries than bitter cherries in the Þeld are caused by host fruit and not genetic factors.

Authors

YEE WEE L., GOUGHNOUR ROBERT B., AND JFEDER EFFREY L.

Keywords

Western cherry fruit ßy, Prunus avium, Prunus emarginata, head width, wing length

Attachments

Content Type: Item
Created at 17/06/2013 15:57 by NAIR, Deepu
Last modified at 17/06/2013 15:57 by NAIR, Deepu