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IDIDAS : References: Irradiation of Adult Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae): Egg Sterility in Parental and F1 Generations

Title

Irradiation of Adult Epiphyas postvittana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae):  Egg Sterility in Parental and F1 Generations

Year

2012

Source

J. Econ. Entomol. 105(1): 54-61; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1603/EC11135

Abstract

Adult Epiphyas postvittana Walker were irradiated using a Cobalt 60 source to determine the dose needed to achieve complete egg sterility of mated female moths, and egg sterility of female moths mated to F1 generation males. Adult male and female E. postvittana were irradiated at 100, 200, 250, and 300 Gy and their fertility (when crossed with normal moths) was compared with nonirradiated moths. Viable progeny (determined by egg hatch) were found at doses of 100 and 200 Gy, but very little at 250 and 300 Gy. In particular, there was no survival of female progeny into the F1 generation. Males irradiated at 250 and 300 Gy had very low egg eclosion rates (2.25 and 1.86% at 250 and 300 Gy, respectively) when mated with normal females. The F2 generation from those male progeny had a mean percent hatched of  1.02%. Based on our results, a dose of 250Ð300 Gy is recommended for irradiation of E. postvittana adults used for sterile insect technique (SIT) if sterility of parental moths is the desired outcome. Our data also suggests that inclusion of F1 hybrid sterility rather than parental generation sterility into programs using the SIT may allow for doses lower than what we have reported, especially during initial phases of an eradication program where increase Þtness of moths might be desirable. Further research is needed to verify the use of F1 hybrid sterility in light brown apple moth SIT programs

Authors

JANG ERIC B., MCINNIS DONALD O., KURASHIMA RICK, WOODS BILL, AND SUCKLING DAVID M.

Keywords

mating disruption, irradiation, sterile insect technique, light brown apple moth

Attachments

Content Type: Item
Created at 17/06/2013 15:57 by NAIR, Deepu
Last modified at 17/06/2013 15:57 by NAIR, Deepu