For best browsing experience, please use Internet Explorer 7 or a later version.
Type = Unknown
Name = Unknown
Version = 0.0
Major Version = 0
Minor Version = 0
Platform = Unknown
Is Beta = False
Is Crawler = False
Is AOL = False
Is Win16 = False
Is Win32 = False
Supports Frames = False
Supports Tables = False
Supports Cookies = True
Supports VB Script = False
Supports JavaScript = 0.0
Supports Java Applets = False
CDF = False
Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
IDIDAS : References: The effect of irradiation and mass rearing on the anti-predator behaviour of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Title

The effect of irradiation and mass rearing on the anti-predator behaviour of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Year

2014

Source

Bulletin of Entomological Research 104, 176–181 doi:10.1017/S0007485313000643

Abstract

Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are major pests worldwide. The sterile insect technique, where millions of flies are reared, sterilized by irradiation and then released, is one of the most successful and ecologically friendly methods of controlling populations of these pests. The mating behaviour of irradiated and nonirradiated flies has been compared in earlier studies, but there has been little attention paid to the anti-predator behaviour of mass-reared flies, especially with respect to wild flies. Tephritid flies perform a supination display to their jumping spider predators in order to deter attacks. In this study,we evaluated the possibility of using this display to determine the anti-predator capabilities of mass-reared irradiated, non-irradiated flies, and wild flies. We used an arena setup and observed bouts between jumping spiders (Phidippus audax Hentz) and male Mexican fruit flies (Anastrepha ludens Loew). We show that although all flies performed a supination display to their predator, wild flies were more likely to perform a display and were significantly more successful in avoiding attack than mass-reared flies. We suggest that this interaction can be used to develop a rapid realistic method of quality control in evaluating anti-predator abilities of mass-reared fruit flies.

Authors

Rao D., Aguilar-Argüello S., Montoya P. and Díaz-Fleischer F.

Keywords

salticidae, supination, predator–prey interaction, sterile insect technique

Attachments

Content Type: Item
Created at 31/03/2014 15:26 by Abdeljelil Bakri
Last modified at 31/03/2014 15:26 by Abdeljelil Bakri