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Accelerators4Heritage

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Accelerator-based techniques are powerful tools to gain better insight into heritage materials and objects to improve their conservation and restoration. It is possible to determine elemental and chemical composition with high sensitivity and accuracy by applying ion beams and X-rays produced by accelerators. Additional valuable features of these techniques are quantitative chemical imaging and dating to determine the age of the artefact.

The aforementioned investigations contribute to more comprehensive research work in art history, archaeology and conservation science. The analytical information allows for the identification of cultural heritage materials and objects, exploring the manufacturing technology and techniques applied, as well as the source of materials used and, understanding their alteration and possible earlier conservation treatment. It is also possible to determine whether an artefact is original or fake by applying these techniques.


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​Announcement​



​​​The nomination/abstract submission deadline has passed. Thank you very much for your interest. ​​

​​**Nomination deadline is 29 July 2022​**

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Who can participate?

The event is intended for PhD students, postdoctoral and early-stage researchers as well as more experienced material scientists, accelerator-scientists, archaeologists, curators, conservators, and conservation scientists actively involved in the field of characterisation, dating and data interpretation of natural heritage materials and objects with accelerator-based and complementary analytical techniques.​

Introduction

The IAEA has, among its mandates, the promotion and transfer of knowledge towards the analysis of heritage materials using nuclear-based analytical techniques. In-depth characterization of heritage materials is of great importance for conservation issues and is a way to better understand the past when it comes to archaeological sites and artefacts. Going back to the natural and geologic raw materials used to make the artefact, or composing natural heritage is therefore essential. Analytical techniques based on intense radiation sources such as synchrotron radiation and ion beams are becoming widely used for characterizing a wide range of natural raw materials including sedimentary rocks, minerals, pigments, wood, bones, organics, etc. These techniques contribute to give insight on their structure, composition, age, provenance and circulation of the materials, which are valuable information regarding the history of the artefact or the site.

Objectives

The overall objective of this Training Course is to pr​ovide advanced training and enable information exchange for assessing characterization, dating and data interpretation of heritage materials, focusing on the natural raw materials. The main objective of the event is to contribute to the enhancement of ​scientific-technological knowledge in the area of characterization and data interpretation of natural heritage materials with accelerator-based analytical techniques and share good practices for their safe analysis.​​​​

Topics

The key topics of the workshop are:

  • Application of accelerator science and technology for characterization of natural heritage materials: case studies;
  • Dating natural heritage materials using accelerator-based and complementary dating techniques;
  • Recent advances and methodologies development of characterization and dating of natural heritage materials, open science;
  • Access to research infrastructure and modalities;
  • Introduction to radiation-induced damage, key aspects and share best practices towards safe analysis of cultural and natural heritage materials.​

Participation and registration

All persons wishing to participate in the event have to be designated by an IAEA Member State or should be members of organizations that have been invited to attend.

In order to be designated by an IAEA Member State, participants are requested to send the Participation Form (For​m A) to their competent national authority (e.g. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Permanent Mission to the IAEA or National Atomic Energy Authority) for onward transmission to the IAEA by 29 July 2022. Participants who are members of an organization invited to attend are requested to send the Participation Form (Form A) through their organization to the IAEA by above deadline.

A questionnaire is part of the selection process and will be sent to participants upon receipt of the endorsed forms.

Selected participants will be informed in due course on the procedures to be followed with regard to administrative and technical matters.​

No registration fee will be charged to participants attending the training.

Working Language

The official language of the training is English.

Structure

The training course will be held as a virtual event via Microsoft Teams.​

The event will be structured around lectures by experts devoted to the topics mentioned below, followed by Questions and Answers discussion time. A dedicated session to exchange ideas, share experiences and express recommendations will be organized.

Four hours per day are expected between 2-6 p.m. (Vienna time zone, UTC +1). It is expected that the meeting will start at 2 p.m. on 17 October 2022 and finish by 6 p.m. on 21 October 2022 (Vienna time zone, UTC +1).​


IAEA Contacts​

Scientific Secretaries:

Ms Léna Bassel
Heritage Science Specialist

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, A1400 Vienna, Austria
​Tel.: +43 69916-524666
Email: L.Bassel@iaea.org

Ms Aliz Simon
Accelerator Specialist

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, A1400 Vienna, Austria
Tel.: +43 1 2600 21706
Email: Aliz.Simon@iaea.org

​Administrative Secretary:

Ms Marion Linter

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100,
A1400 Vienna, Austria

​Tel.: +43 1 2600 25119​

Email: M.Linter@iaea.org

Subsequent correspondence on scientific matters should be sent to the Scientific Secretaries and correspondence on other matters related to the event to the Administrative Secretary.​​








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​​​The nomination/abstract submission deadline has passed. Thank you very much for your interest. ​


​​Who can participate?

The event is intende​​d both for young and experienced scientists, archaeologists, conservators, curators, art historians, and heritage science stakeholders including policy makers and funding agencies actively involved in the field of characterisation, treatment and management of cultural and natural heritage objects.

Introduction

The main idea of Heritage Management is embedded within the World Heritage Convention (1972). It states that it is our obligation, as humans, to promote the identification, protection, conservation, preservation, and transmission to future generations of the cultural and natural heritage. Sustainably pursuing such activities started to appear later, such as on the Budapest Declaration (2002), and has become a central notion on all human affairs. There should always be a balance on what is produced and what is preserved, on the new and the old, so that future generations can flourish knowing where its roots are.

The big breakthroughs which change our thinking and knowledge are expected to come at the intersection of the major disciplines. Increasingly apparent to scientists, science policy makers and governmental agencies is that an understanding of mankind's past and its impact on the environment is central to tackle the problems of global warming, biodiversity, landscape management and sustainability.

Analytical techniques using intense photon, electron and ion beams produced by particle accelerators, synchrotrons, microscopes and other sources are powerful tools to gain better insight into our tangible heritage. They indeed contribute to understand their structure, composition, age, manufacturing technology and techniques applied, the source of materials used and understand their alteration and possible earlier conservation treatment. It is also possible to determine whether an artefact is original or fake by applying these techniques. Using ionizing radiation for the conservation of tangible cultural heritage is a very efficient method.​

Objectives

The overall objective of this Workshop is to provide a forum for nuclear scientists, conservators, curators, art historians, archaeologist and heritage science stakeholders including policy makers and funding agencies to present and discuss recent developments in accelerator-based techniques and data science as well as exchange ideas and build collaborations on innovative approaches of accelerator science and technology for cultural and natural heritage and its sustainable management.

Key topics

The key topics of the workshop are:​

  • Application of accelerator science and technology for characterization and treatment of heritage objects and materials;
  • Interpretation, presentation and dissemination of the scientific results: case studies and success stories;
  • Safe analysis of heritage objects; Best practice and Irradiation Passport for Art;
  • Detecting intellectual property crime as forgeries and fighting illicit trade of art objects with nuclear techniques;
  • Access to research infrastructure, and international as well as regional collaborations and networks;
  • Sustainable Heritage Management policies and modalities;
  • Open Science and dissemination of knowledge;
  • Research priorities, Resources, and funding structures for heritage science;
  • How to make science tangible? - Public awareness of how science and heritage work together in a tangible way - novel methods in education and outreach

Abstract Submission

Participants who wish to ​give presentations are requested to submit an abstract of their work. The abstract will be reviewed as part of the selection process for presentations. Anyone presenting a contribution at the event is requested to submit an abstract of not more than 500 words through IAEA-INDICO platform by 7 April 2022.

Abstracts may contain figures and graphics and are to be uploaded as a PDF file.​

Authors are encouraged to flag their proposals as an oral or poster presentation. However, the International Programme Advisory Committee will evaluate all submissions and decide on the final presentation format.

Authors will be notified by email by 28 April 2022 of the acceptance of their proposed presentations.​

​​Setting-up your IAEA-INDICO account

​​Persons with an existing NUCLEUS account can sign in here with their username and password​;
Persons without an existing NUCLEUS account can register here​.
​Next, please login in INDICO and activate the associated INDICO account.


  • How to submit an abstract using INDICO?​​​​

Please visit the INDICO website (https://conferences.iaea.org/event/291/)​, where you will find the Call for Abstracts and click on the blue tab "Submit new abstract".​

INDICO Tutorial: Submitting an Abstract - Learning Indico (getindico.io)


Participation

All persons wishing to participate in the event have to be designated by an IAEA Member State or should be members of organizations that have been invited to attend.

In order to be designated by an IAEA Member State, participants are requested to send the Participation Form (Form A​) to their competent national authority (e.g. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Permanent Mission to the IAEA or National Atomic Energy Authority) for onward transmission to the IAEA by 7 April 2022. Participants who are members of an organization invited to attend are requested to send the Participation Form (Form A) through their organization to the IAEA by above deadline.

Selected participants will be informed in due course on the procedures to be followed with regard to administrative and technical matters. 


  • ​​Required Forms: 
​Participant wishes to present an oral or poster presentation​
​Form A​, Form B and abstract with oral or poster presentation preference
​Participant with no presentation
​Form A and questionnaire
​Participant wishes to apply for financial support
Form AForm BForm C​​​ and abstract with oral or poster presentation preference


Please also find some lastest info on Covid-19 here​.

Expenditures and financial support

The costs for the organization of the meeting are borne by the IAEA.
No registration fee will be charged to participants attending the meeting.

As a general rule, the IAEA does not pay for participants' travel and living expenses. However, limited funds are available to help meet the cost of attendance of selected specialists, mainly from developing countries with low economic resources. Generally, not more than one travel grant may be awarded to any one country.

If Governments wish to apply for a grant on behalf of one of their specialists, they should address specific requests to the IAEA Scientific Secretary at the International Atomic Energy Agency to this effect. Governments should ensure that applications for grants:

a) are received by the IAEA before 7 April 2022,
b) are accompanied by a duly completed and signed Grant Form C,
c) are accompanied by a duly completed and signed Form AForm B​ and abstract fully relevant to the scope of the technical meeting.

Applications that do not comply with the conditions mentioned above cannot be considered.

Awards will be announced around 28 April 2022.

Working Language

The official language of the meeting is English (no interpretation will be provided).

Structure

The meeting will be held as a hybrid meeting, at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, and virtually via Microsoft Teams.

The meeting will have invited and contributed oral talks presented in sessions devoted to the special topics mentioned above, with subsequent discussions.

A poster session will be organized and panel discussions on specific topics are also planned.

IAEA Contacts​

Scientific Secretaries:

Ms Aliz Simon
Accelerator Specialist

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, A1400 Vienna, Austria
Tel.: +43 1 2600 21706
Email: Aliz.Simon@iaea.org

Ms Léna Bassel
Heritage Science Specialist

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, A1400 Vienna, Austria
​Tel.: +43 69916-524666
Email: L.Bassel@iaea.org

​Administrative Secretary:

Mr Ruben Gomez Zaragoza

International Atomic Energy Agency
Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences
Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100,
A1400 Vienna, Austria
​Tel.: +43 1 2600 26393

Email: R.Gomez-Zaragoza@iaea.org

​Su​​bsequent correspondance on scientific matters should be sent to the Scientific Secretaries.
Should you need any additional information about INDICO, please contact Ms Lena Bassel.
Should you need any additional information about the competent national authority, please cont​act Mr Ruben Gomez Zaragoza.





Safe Analysis of Heritage Objects and Materials

 

Novel generation synchrotron and ion beam techniques are powerful tools for the analysis of heritage objects and materials. Recent technological developments at synchrotron facilities have made full scanning of entire paintings and paleontological fossils available as well as investigating unique micro-samples of the highest historical values. At ion beam facilities, the in-situ study of objects using external nuclear microprobes has been a major breakthrough that can be coupled to advanced high-resolution measurements on samples in a vacuum environment. With the development of these and complementary techniques (laser-based techniques, mass spectrometric methods, thermoluminescence), heritage materials and objects are increasingly subject to subsequent analysis, i.e. irradiation.

When dealing with cultural heritage artefacts, material modification can occur due to the applied radiation. This is an essential consideration and a major concern of heritage end-users i.e. curators, conservators, and archaeologists.

Usually, analysts focus on getting as much analytical information as possible. Due to the large amount of energy deposited when performing these measurements, there is a risk of degradation of the materials under study. The application of high doses is regularly applied to compensate for the limited sensitivity of currently available detectors. Material damage can sometimes be visible to the human eye: formation of colour centres in glass, browning of organic compounds, etc. The potential loss of information or worse, the retrieval of misleading or biased information from an area damaged by radiation, even without direct visual consequences to the sample or object, poses a major analytical risk. Although a range of precautions is usually taken to minimize risk, these measures remain mostly at the stage of local 'recipes' that are not discussed jointly nor shared.

The fundamentals of radiation effects on complex material systems like heritage materials, the short and long-term impact on material modification by advanced ion and photon-based characterisation methods, all remain largely open. We are dedicated to pursuing safe analysis of heritage objects and materials and, are working to achieve this goal. Below, is our recent brochure intended to assist analysts and curators in discussions of the various aspects that minimize material modification before/during/after the analysis.

Useful to read for fundamentals of radiation effects on heritage objects and materials with extensive references our paper: L. Bertrand, S. Schoder, A. Demetrios, M.B.H. Breese, K. Janssens, M. Moini, A. Simon: Mitigation strategies for radiation damage in the analysis of ancient materials, Trends in Analytical Chemistry, 66 (2015) 128-145. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trac.2014.10.005


Nuclear Science for Art: Workshop Focuses on Safe Practices, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands (RCE) and Rijks Museum together with the IAEA, 2017

Aliz SIMON, IAEA, Physics Section, Vienna, Austria

Loïc BERTRAND, IPANEMA CNRS Culture UVSQ, Univ. Paris-Saclay; Synchrotron SOLEIL, Saint-Aubin, France

Thomas CALLIGARO, Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France (C2RMF), Paris, France

Flyura DJURABEKOVA, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Finland

Ineke JOOSTEN, Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands, Amersfoort/Amsterdam, Netherlands

Samuel WEBB, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), SLAC National Laboratory, USA

Maartje STOLS-WITLOX, University of Amsterdam, Programme Conservation and Restoration of Cultural Heritage, Amsterdam, Netherlands

 

pamphlet-safe-analysis.jpg pamphlet-safe-analysis2.jpg

You can download the pamphlet here.


Design of the interactive PDF and the pamphlet by Anja Wartig Pessoa Barradas.