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5124
  
1965
Proc Fla State Hort Soc 78:233-237
Grierson W., Dennison R.A.
IDCT
5123
  
2000
J. Am. Soc. Hortic. Sci. 125:364–369
McDonald, R.E., W.R. Miller, and T.G. McCollum.
IDCT
5122
  
1971
HORTSCIENCE VoL.6 (3): 202-204
This paper examines irradiation of 20 fresh fruits and vegetables from the standpoint of disease control and increasing shelf life in all cases except one where it is concerned with controlling fruit fly at 250 Gy. Without giving many details for each commodity the paper concludes that the commodities range in tolerance from 150 Gy for asparagus to 2000 Gy for cantaloupes, oranges and strawberries. Almost all of the 20 fruits and vegetables tested tolerate doses required for phytosanitary irradiation.
Maxie E. C., Sommer N. F. and Mitchell F. G.
IDCT
5121
  
1961
Economy Botany vol.15, issue 1: pp28-56
This paper was concerned with shelf life extension by surface pasteurization, sprout inhibition, and retarding the ripening process. Doses were 1-5 kGy. Tolerance varied by cultivar of certain commodities.
Salunkhe D.K.
IDCT
5120
  
1966
Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural 79 296-301.
Stored irradiated Navel oranges became lighter in color than control fruit, as evidenced by reflectance measurements and color specifica tions. This difference was greater after 30 days at 50 F than at 35 and 68 F. Initially light- and dark-colored Temples exhibited increasing reflectance values during storage. Differences in per cent reflectance due to irradiation were most pronounced in the light-colored fruit stored at 50 F. The stored irradiated Temples possessed a yellow-orange color as compared to the orange color of the non-irradiated fruit. Flavedo carotenoids were extracted and sep arated by thin-layer chromatography. Radiation- induced color loss was due to decreased concen trations of a relatively few carotenoids. The chief losses of Temple carotenoids were in an esterified orange-colored xanthophyll and an un- esterified yellow xanthophyll
Ahmed EM, Knapp FW and Dennison RA
IDCT
5119
  
2014
Food Science and Human Wellness,3; 9-15.
Zhang Ke, Deng Y., Fu H. and Weng Q.
IDCT
5118
  
1976
Journal of food science and Technology. Japan 23 (7), 300 – 305
Watanabe, H. et al.
IDCT
5117
  
2003
ISHS Acta Horticulturae 628.
Vanamala J.K.B., Cobb B.G., Pike L.M., Patil B.S.
IDCT
5116
  
1969
Journal of food science and technology [nihon shokuhin kogyo gakkai-shi] 16(9): 397-404.
Umeda K., et al.
IDCT
5115
  
1978
Shokuhin Sogo Kenkyusho kenkyu Hokoku.74-78. March,.
Takano H., Kawashina K., Umeda K.
IDCT
5114
  
1964
Radiation Botany, 4; 317-322.
Sommer N.F., Maxie E.C., Fortlage R.J. and Eckert J.W.
IDCT
5113
  
1985
Radiation disinfestation of food and Agriculture Products. Ed by J. Moy.
Spalding D.H. and Davis D.F.
IDCT
5112
  
1963
Radiat Bot. 3; 363.
Romani R.J., Van Koo Y., Lim J. and Bowers B
IDCT
5111
  
1975
Radiation Botany, 15; 257-260.
Riov J.
IDCT
5110
  
1972
Radiation Res. Rev.3; 417-427.
Riov J., Monselice S.P., Green R. and Kahan R.S.
IDCT
5109
  
1971
Radiation Research, 45; 326-334 .
Riov, J., Goren R., Monselise S.P. and Kahan R.S.
IDCT
5108
  
1970
Radiation Botany, 10; 155-160.
Riov J and Goren R.
IDCT
5107
  
2000
Food and machinery - en.cnki.com.cn
Pong Jie
IDCT
5106
  
1985
Journal of food science, 50; 639 - 646. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1985.tb13762.x
Navel oranges from two locations in California were given low postharvest doses of gamma radiation (60 - 80 Krads) and compared with nonirradiated controls for taste, flavor, odor, firmness, degree of orange color, degree of brown blemishing, ease of peeling and intactness of the membranes on sectioning. Practiced judges were used as an analytical screening tool using minimal cross-sensory interference, while untrained subjects were used to determine whether changes might be distinguished by‘nonexperts’. Greatest differences were found for degree of blemishing, lesser differences for flavor by mouth and odor and some trends for taste, color, texture and ease of peeling.
O’Mahony M., Wong S.Y. and Odobert N.
IDCT
5105
  
1985
Journal of food science, 50; 215-219.
Nagai N.Y and J.H. Moy
IDCT
5104
  
2002
Radiation Physics and chemistry 63 (3-6): pp 397- 401. DOI: 10.1016/S0969-806X(01)00557-6
Most tropical fruits for export must be treated with an approved quarantine treatment. Three and a half decades of research have demonstrated the efficacy of irradiation as a quarantine treatment in terms of efficiency, effectiveness, and product quality retention. The USFDA and the USDA-APHIS approved irradiation to disinfest fresh foods/fresh papayas in 1986 and 1989, respectively. In early 1995, the Hawaii Department of Agriculture was granted a special permit from USDA-APHIS allowing untreated Hawaiian fruits to be irradiated on the US mainland. The objectives were to gain experience in commercial irradiation as a quarantine treatment and to gather data on shipping and handling procedures, and on product quality. In April 1995, the first shipment of Hawaiian fruit was irradiated at a minimum quarantine dose of 0.25 kGy in an Isomedix plant near Chicago, and then distributed to supermarkets in Illinois and Ohio. Continuous shipments, irradiation, and marketing of various tropical fruits in the US have shown commercial efficacy, quality retention, and excellent consumer acceptance. A commercial e-beam/converted X-ray facility was installed by Titan Corp. on the Island of Hawaii and was operational by late July 2000. Hawaii has become the first place in the world to use irradiation as a quarantine treatment of fruits.
Moy J.H. and L.Wong.
IDCT
5103
  
1986
FAO/IAEA. Seminar for Asia and the Pacific on Practical Application of Food Irradiation Shanghai, April, IAEA-SR-129/11.
Moy J.H.
IDCT
5102
  
2004
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Volume 84, Issue 13, pp.1625–1631. DOI: 10.1002/jsfa.1849
Moussaid M., S.Caillet, M.Lacroix, J. N Katsia-Tabine and C. Boubekri
IDCT
5101
  
2002
Proceeding Study of the Impact of Food Irradiation on preventing losses: experience in Africa, IAEA-TECDOC-1291 International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); 103 p; ISSN 1011-4289; May 2002; p. 13-16; Final research co-ordination meeting on study of the impact of food irradiation on preventing losses: Experience in Africa; Pretoria (South Africa); 20-24 Sep 1999
Moussaid El Idrissi, M.; R'Kiek, C.; Farahat Laaroussi, S.; Zantar; Mouhib, M.; El Guerrouj, D.; Toukour, L.
IDCT
5100
  
1982
J. Amer.Soc. Hort. Scie. 109 (5): 607.
Moshonas M.G. and Shaw P.E.
IDCT
5099
  
1966
Radiat. Bot. 6, 265-74.
Monselise S.P., Goren R.
IDCT
5098
  
1966
Preservation of fruit and vegetables by radiation FAO/IAEA. PL-193/1, 93-103
Monselise S.P. and Kahan R.S.
IDCT
5097
  
2000
Hort science 35 (7) 288-291.
Miller W.R., McDonald R.E. and Chaparro J.
IDCT
5096
  
1966
Postharvest Biol. Technol. 7 (3) 253-260.
Miller W.R., McDonald R.E. and Chaparro J.
IDCT
5095
  
2013
Postharvest Biology and Technology. 86:91-99.
McDonald H., Arpaia M.L., Caporaso F., Obenland F., Were D., Rakovski L. and Prakash A.
IDCT
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